Twentieth Alabama
Infantry Regiment

Jones (Robert T.) Regiment
A. Brooks Light Infantry
B. Phoenx Reds
C. Jefferson Rifles
D. Black Warriors/ Bibb Rangers
E. Greene County Grays
F. Perry County Boys
G. Cahaba Valley Guards
H. Perry and Bibby Liners
I. Planter's Guards

Roster
(Surnames)

A-B

C-E

F-H

I-L

M-O

P-R

S-V

W-Z

This regiment was organized at Montgomery, Sept. 16, 1861, and proceeded to Mobile in November. In February 1862 it went to Knoxville, and was placed under Gen. Leadbetter of Mobile. Transferred to Barton's brigade, the Twentieth operated for some time in east Tennessee, and advanced into Kentucky with Gen. Kirby Smith, being in Reynolds' brigade, Heth's division. It was in the pursuit of Gen. Sill on Salt river, and joined Gen. Bragg just after the battle of Perryville. The regiment was in Col. T.H. Taylor's brigade for a short time, but shortly after the return to Tennessee a brigade of Alabamians was organized - the Twentieth, Twenty-third, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Forty-sixth regiments - and placed under Gen. Tracy of Madison, and in Stevenson's division. A few days prior to the battle of Murfreesboro, the division was sent to Vicksburg, and the regiment fought at Port Gibson the following spring, losing heavily in casualties. At Baker's Creek it again suffered severely, and was then pent up in Vicksburg. During that dreary siege the ranks of the Twentieth were greatly thinned, and it surrendered with the fortress. After the fall of Gen. Tracy at Port Gibson, Gen. S.D. Lee of South Carolina commanded the brigade, till Gen. Pettus of Dallas was placed over it in the parol camp at Demopolis. Ordered to join Gen. Bragg, the Twentieth participated in the battle of Mission Ridge without loss. The winter was passed at Dalton, and the regiment was engaged in the constant fighting from Dalton to Atlanta, being conspicuous at Rocky-face, and losing heavily at Kennesa. Its colors were borne through the iron hail at Jonesboro, and the remnant suffered severely. It moved into Tennessee with Gen. Hood, and lost largely at Nashville. From that disastrous field the Twentieth passed into North Carolina, and fought at Kinston and Bentonville. It was surrendered at Salisbury - about 165 rank and file. Of the original 1100 men with which the Twentieth took the field, only 63 were present at Salisbury.

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