Lucius Marsh Walker

Monument: Find-a-Grave

Lucius  Marshall (Marsh) Walker, a nephew of President James K. Polk, and brother-in-law of General Frank C. Armstrong, was born at Columbia, Tennessee, on October 18, 1829. Graduated from West Point in the class of 1850, he resigned two years later to enter the mercantile business at Memphis, where he was residing in  1861. Walker went into the Confederate Army as lieutenant colonel of the 40th Tennessee Infantry, of which he was made colonel on November 11, 1861 and assigned to command of the post at Memphis. He was promoted brigadier gen­eral to rank  from  March 11,1862.  He went into the Confederate Army as lieutenant colonel of the 40th Tennessee Infantry, of which he was made colonel on November 11, 1861 and assigned to command of the post at Memphis. He was promoted brigadier general to rank from March 11, 1862.  On account of illness he was not present at Shiloh, but was later at Corinth and took part in the retreat to Tupelo and the engagement at Farmington.  He incurred the displeasure of Braxton Bragg, who informed Richmond that Walker was not a "safe" man "to intrust with any command," and later approved his application for a transfer west of the Mississippi.  Reporting to Kirby Smith in March 1863, he was given command of a cavalry brigade and participated in Sterling Price's attack on Helena. Subsequently he fell out with General John S. Marmaduke, who had allegedly reflected unfavorably on Walker's courage. Despite Price's efforts to prevent a duel the event was arranged—"pistols at ten paces to fire and advance." At sunrise on the morning of September 6, 1863, at Little Rock, Arkansas, the antagonists met and General Walker fell mortally wounded. He died the following day and is buried in Memphis.

Ref: Generals in Gray, Lives of the Confederate Commanders by Ezra J. Warner.  Printed by Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London.

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