Mosby Monroe Parsons
(1822-1865)

Brigadier General

Headstone: Find-a-Grave

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Reference: Alabama Department of Archives & History. Custodian of the original pictures. Confederate Officers photo album.  http://www.archives.alabama.gov/conoffalb/index.html

Mosby Monroe Parsons was born at Charlottesville, Virginia, May 21, 1822. He moved as a young man to Cole County, Missouri, where he studied law, and was admitted to the bar. During the war with Mexico he commanded a company of mounted volunteers. From 1853 to 1857 he was attorney general of Missouri, and subsequently was elected to the state senate. Parsons was actively allied with Governor Claiborne Jackson in an effort to hold Missouri to the Confederate cause. He commanded the 6th Division of the Missouri State Guard from the outbreak of war until he was commissioned brigadier in the Confederate service on November 5, 1862. He fought at Carthage, Springfield, and Elkhorn, and in the Arkansas campaigns of 1862 and 1863. The following year he was sent to reinforce Richard Taylor during the Red River campaign, where he was present at Pleasant Hill, and later participated in the engagements at Marks' Mills and Jenkins' Ferry against Steele. As of April 30, 1864 he was assigned to duty as a major general by Kirby Smith and was so paroled, although he was never officially appointed by the President. He accompanied Sterling Price on the 1864 raid into Missouri, and went to Mexico after the close of the war. Accounts of his death vary. It seems reasonably certain that he attached himself to the Imperialist forces, and was killed by Republican irregulars, probably on August 15, 1865, in the vicinity of China, on the San Juan River, in the state of Nuevo Leon. So far as is known, the bodies of Parsons and his five companions ó including his brother-in-law and ex-adjutant, Captain A. M. Standish, and A. H. Conrow, late a member of the Confederate Congressówere buried in the neighborhood.

Ref: Generals in Gray, Lives of the Confederate Commanders by Ezra J. Warner.  Printed by Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge and London.