1st Regiment Light Artillery
Battery A

("Hexamer's")

Roster
 


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Smoketown Road neat the intersection with Mumma Lane Antietam

Hexamer's (New Jersey) Battery
September 17, 1862

From a position about 60 yards south of this point the battery, between 2 and 3 p.m. engaged and silenced the Confederate Artillery around the Dunker Church.

Hexamer's Light Artillery New 
Jersey Antietam

 
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North side of Bloody Lane near the Tower Antietam

Monument Text

Hexamer's (New Jersey) Battery
September 17, 1862

From 3:30 p.m. until near sunset this Battery
from a point about 80 yards north of this, engaged the enemy around the Piper Buildings.


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South Hancock Avenue, Cemetery Ridge Gettysburg

Front

Battery A. I. N. J. Art.
From its position in
reserves S. W. of Powers'
Hill Galloped into action
at 3 P. M. July 3, 1863.
Fired 120 rounds shrapnel
at Pickett's column, and
80 shell at a battery
in left front.
Erected by the
State of New Jersey 1888.

Lower Plaque
Hexamer's New Jersey
Battery
Commanded in this battle by First Lieutenant
Augustine N. Parsons

Left

Losses, Killed 8, Wounded 7.
Position in action 45 yards
E. of this stone.

Right

Served Aug. 12, 1861
to June 22, 1865
Engaged in 30 battles.

Organized at Hoboken, N.J., and mustered in August 12, 1861. Left State for Washington, D.C., August 20, 1861. Attached to Kearney's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1862. Artillery, 1st Division, 6th Army Corps, to May, 1863. Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps, to June, 1863. 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to October. 1863. 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, to March, 1864. 1st Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, to May, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps. to July, 1864. Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to December, 1864. Artillery Brigade, 6th Army Corps, to June, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D.C., until. March, 1862. Advance on Manassas, Va., March 10-15, 1862. Advance from Alexandria to Bristoe Station April 7-11. Embarked for the Virginia Peninsula April 17. Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 19-May 4 (on transports). West Point May 7-8. Battle of Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks) May 31-June 1. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Gaines' Mill June 27. Brackett's June 30. Charles City Cross Roads and Glendale June 30. Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing until August 16. Movement to Manassas August 16-26. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 26-September 2. Bull Run Bridge August 27. Chantilly September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Crampton's Pass, Md., September 14. Antietam September 16-17. Duty in Maryland until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. Duty near Falmouth, Va., until April 27, 1(63. "Mud March" January 20-24. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Franklin's Crossing April 29-May 2. Battle of Maryes Heights, Fredericksburg, May 3. Salem Heights May 3-4. Banks' Ford May

Battery lost during service 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 12 Enlisted men by disease. Total 15.

This Battery was originally organized as a part of the Militia force of the State, and was attached to the Third Regiment, Hudson Brigade. It remained in this connection until the breaking out of the Rebellion in 1861, when the services of the Battery were tendered to the Governor of this State, but by reason of no authority having been received for the acceptance of this branch of the service, their offer was declined. Its organization was continued and recruited up to the full standard, and waited only an opportunity to enter the service. In this they were at last successful, having been accepted under the provisions of an Act of Congress, approved July 22, 1861, and by authority received by the Governor from the War Department, Washington, D. C., dated July 29, 1861. The Battery was then organized and completed under the requirements of General Orders No. 16, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., May 4, 1861. It was fully completed, officered and equipped by the 12th day of August, 1861, at which time it was mustered into the service of the United States for three years or during the war, at Hoboken, New Jersey, by Frederick S. Larned, Captain Twelfth Infantry, United States Army, the strength of the Battery being - Officers, 5; Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates, 151. Total, 156. It left the State August 20, 1861, en route to Washington, D. C. Soon after arrival it was furnished with the necessary outfit of guns, horses and equipments, and under orders crossed into Virginia, having been assigned to the First New Jersey Brigade. On the 16th of October, 1862, by reason of the disbandment of Company K, First Regiment, Infantry, the greater part of the enlisted men of that Company joined the Battery by transfer. Under the provisions of General Orders No. 191, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., June 25, 1863, a number of the enlisted men re-enlisted in the field for three years or during the war. Those who did not re-enlist and whose term of service having expired, reported at Trenton, N. J., in compliance with Special Orders No. 213, Paragraph 2, Head Quarters Army of the Potomac, August 9, 1864, and were mustered out August 18, 1864, by George B. Eckert, First Lieutenant Third Infantry, United States Army. At different times during the years 1862, 1863 and 1864, the strength of the Battery was increased by the joining from Draft Rendezvous, Trenton, N. J., of a large number of recruits and some substitutes. The Battery continued its organization and remained in active service until the close of the war, when it was mustered out at Trenton, N. J., June 22, 1865, by R. Burnett Smith, Brevet Captain Eleventh Infantry, United States Army, in compliance with General Orders No. 105, War Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., June 2, 1865.

The Battery was first attached to the Defenses of Washington, D. C.; then to an Artillery Brigade, Franklin's Division, Army of the Potomac; then to an Artillery Brigade, First Division, Army of the Potomac: then to an Artillery Brigade, First Division, Sixth Army Corps; then to an Artillery Brigade, Sixth Army Corps; then to the Fourth Brigade, Volunteer Division, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac; then to the Fourth Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac; then to the Third Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac; then to the First Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac; then to the Second Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac; then to an Artillery Brigade, Sixth Army Corps.

FIRST REGIMENT. ARTILLERY. MUSTERED IN. GAINED. Total Strength. CASUALTIES. Total.
Officers. Enlisted Men. Officers. Enlisted Men. MUSTERED OUT. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. ENLISTED MEN.
Officers. Enlisted Men. Resigned. Discharged. Promoted Transferred. Died. Deserted. Dismissed. Not accounted for. Discharged. Transferred. Promoted. Died. Deserted. Not accounted for.
Battery A 5 151 11 354 521 7 358 7 1       1          51 59    15 16 6 521
" B 5 159 6 467 637 4 379 2    3    1    1    39 125 4 30 32 17 637
" C 3 141 6 155 305 5 166 1                3    15 15    12 85 3 305
" D 3 141 6 301 451 6 260 2 1                   19 15    32 116    451
" E 3 141 5 427 576 4 387 3                1    21 14    23 121 2 576
Total 19 733 34 1704 2490 26 1550 15 2 3    2    5    145 228 4 112 370 28 2490

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Record of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865.  Volume II.  Compiled in the Office of the Adjutant General.  Published by Authority of the Legislature.  William S. Stryker, Adjutant General.  Trenton, New Jersey, John L. Murphy, Steam Book and Job Printer, 1876.