11th Regiment Infantry (3 years)

(Click on picture for a larger one)

Doubleday Avenue, Oak Ridge

Front:

11th Pennsylvania Infantry
(Looks like a cat laying down on a little platform)**

Left Side:

11th Pennsylvania Infantry

2d Brigade 2d Division 1st Corps

Mustered in April 26, 1861
Mustered out Aug. 1, 1861
Mustered in Sept-Nov 1861
Re-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864
Mustered out July 1, 1865

Recruited in Lycoming Clinton Luzerne
Northumberland Montour Westmoreland
Cumberland Allegheny Carbon and Dauphin Counties.

Rear:

Present at Gettysburg 23 officers and 269 men. Killed & died of wounds 13 men.
Wounded 8 officers. 54 men
Captured or missing 57 men
Total 132
Total enrollment 2096
Killed & died of wounds 12 officers. 219 men Total 231
Wounded 43 officers. 729 men
Total 772
Died of disease etc. 4 officers
167 men Total 171
Captured or missing 5 officers
253 men Total 258
Total casualties 1432

Right:

Hoke's Run
Cedar Mountain
Rappahannock Station
Thoroughfare Cap
Bull Run 2d
Chantilly
South Mountain
Antietam
Fredericksburg
Chancellorsville
Gettysburg
Mine Run
Wilderness
Spotsylvania
North Anna
Totopotomoy
Bethesday Church
Cold Harbor
Petersburg
Weldon Railroad
Danbey's Mill
Boydton Road or Gravelly Run
Five Forks
Appomattox

I received an e-mail stating that the animal laying down near the base of the monument is actually a dog, not a cat.  Here is the e-mail:

Hello,

I enjoyed reading about the 11
th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry monument at Gettysburg on your Web site and thought you might like some additional information about the statue you mention that “looks like a cat laying down on a little platform.“ The figure is actually a dog, and to the best of my knowledge it is the only statue erected by Civil War soldiers to their canine mascot.

The dog was Sallie Ann Jarrett, who joined the 11
th in May 1861, while the regiment was forming at Camp Wayne in West Chester, Pennsylvania. She served nearly until the end of the war, when she was killed in the fighting at Hatcher’s Run on Feb. 5, 1865.

Sallie gained fame at Gettysburg for staying with her wounded and dead companions on Oak Ridge when the regiment retreated to Cemetery Hill after the first day’s fighting.  The soldiers feared she had been killed, but she was found days later, still guarding her fallen companions.  

It's interesting to note that while Sallie’s presence on the monument was meaningful to the regiment’s veterans, she is not identified on the monument and, as a result, her statue has been an object of curiosity to Battlefield visitors ever since its dedication in 1890. To those who know her story, her statue is also a powerful symbol of the bond of loyalty that unites soldiers and their dogs. Many visitors leave small tokens--biscuits, flags, coins--for Sallie as tributes to her devotion to her soldiers. Some visitors also have their photos--and sometimes their own dogs' photos--taken will Sallie's statue.

You can read more about Sallie here:

http://www.loyalty-of-dogs.blogspot.com/p/blog.html

http://www.loyaltyofdogs.com/ReadPosterTribute.htm

Nancy Wennberg
LoyaltyOfDogs.com

 

Roster

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Field & Staff--Band--Unassigned

Organized at Harrisburg and in Westmoreland County August, 1861. At Camp Curtin until November 27. Moved to Baltimore, Md., November 27; thence to Annapolis, Md. Attached to Annapolis, Md., Middle Department, to April, 1862. Wadsworth's Command, Military District of Washington, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Ord's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Army Corps, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

SERVICE.--Duty at Annapolis, Md., until April 9, 1862. Moved to Washington, D.C., April 9-10; thence to Manassas Junction April 17, and guard Manassas Gap Railroad until May 12. Moved to Catlett's Station May 12 and to Falmouth May 14. Expedition to Front Royal June. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Fords of the Rappahannock August 21-23. Warrenton August 26. Thoroughfare Gap August 28. Bull Run August 30. Chanuntily September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-24. Battles of South Mountain September 14. Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Sharpsburg until October 30. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 19. Battle of Fredericksburg, Va., December 12-15. "Mud March" January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth and Belle Plain until April 27. ChancellorsviIle Campaign April 27-May 6. Operations at Pollock's Mill Creek April 29-May 2. Fitzhugh's Crossing April 29-30. ChancellorsviIle May 2-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 1-3 (served with 1st Brigade July 1 to 18). Duty on the Rapidan until October. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7, 1864. Regiment reenlisted January 5, 1864. Veterans on furlough February 5 to March 28. Rapidan Campaign May-June. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 25. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Bethesda Church June 1-3. White Oak Swamp June 13. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Mine Explosion Petersburg July 30, 1864 (Reserve). Weldon Railroad August 18-21. Reconnaissance toward Dinwiddie Court House September 15. Warren's Raid to Weldon Railroad December 7-12. Dabney's Mills, Hatcher's Run, February 5-7, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9. Lewis Farm, Gravelly Run, March 29. White Oak Road March 31. Five Forks April 1. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Moved to Washington May. Grand Review May 23. Mustered out July 1, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 12 Officers and 224 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 4 Officers and 177 Enlisted men by disease. Total 417.

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