192nd Regiment Infantry
(100 days)

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D

E F G H I K L M N O P

Field & Staff

192nd Regiment Infantry
(1 year)

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A B C D E F G H I K

Field & Staff---Unassigned

Organized at Philadelphia for 100 days July, 1864. At Camp Cadwalader until July 23. Moved to Baltimore, Md., July 23. Attached to 2nd Separate Brigade, 8th Corps, Middle Department, July, 1864. Gallipolis, Ohio, Northern Department, to November.

SERVICE.--Duty at Baltimore, Md., until August 1 and at Fort McHenry until August 15. Moved to Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, August 15, Company "K," at Ironton, Ohio, August to November. Duty at Gallipolis, Ohio, September to November. Mustered out November 11, 1864. Regiment reorganized for one year February, 1865. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the Shenandoah, to April, 1865. Sub-District of Harper's Ferry, District of West Virginia, Middle Department, to August, 1865. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley. Mustered out August 24, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 16 by disease.

The Twentieth Pennsylvania Militia, which had been called out for the defense of the State, in 1862, under command of Colonel William B. Thomas, and again in 1863, was re-organized and recruited in July, 1864, for service in the National army, for a period of one hundred days, as the One Hundred and Ninety-second Regiment of the line. It was recruited in the city of Philadelphia, the troops rendezvousing at Camp Cadwalader, and consisted of fourteen companies, commanded by the following field officers:

William B. Thomas, Colonel
Benjamin L. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel
C. W. M'Clintock, Major
Henry J. Snyder, Major

The regiment left Philadelphia on the 23d of July, and proceeded to Baltimore, encamping until the close of the month, about five miles from the city.

On the 1st of August, it was ordered to garrison duty at Fort McHenry. It was here drilled in heavy artillery duty, by a Lieutenant of the regular army. It had been previously well instructed in light infantry tactics by Colonel Thomas.

Two weeks later it was relieved at the fort, and proceeded via Harrisburg and Pittsburg, to Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, where were confined large numbers of prisoners of war. It remained here but a few days, when its destination was again changed, and heading southward, it proceeded by rail to Gallipolis, a little town on the Ohio River, nearly opposite the mouth of the Great Kanawha River.

Early in the war, the great advantages of this place for a depot of supplies for the Union armies, were recognized, and vast quantities had been accumulated there. To guard these, and ship and re-ship them as needed, was the duty to which the regiment was assigned. This was a responsible and arduous service. Raiding and guerrilla bands were constantly hovering in the neighborhood, and more than one bold plot was formed for the destruction of these supplies, which were of vital importance to the armies in West Virginia and in Tennessee. Detachments were regularly supplied for guard to boats plying upon the river while others were frequently sent out to break up irregular bands of the enemy.

On the 30th of September, companies At, A, B, F, D, L and G, under command of Major McClintock, proceeded to Weston, West Virginia, where they served under command of General Kelley, until the close of their term of enlistment. Lieutenant William E. Tyndale, in command of company K, while on his way with his command from Ironton, where he had for six weeks been on duty, to re-join the regiment, was drowned in the Ohio River, on the night of the 21st of October, by being accidentally precipitated, from the transport on which he was moving. He was a good officer, and had served with credit at the front, in the earlier years of the war.

On the 31st of October, the term of service of the regiment having already expired, the battalion remaining at Gallipolis was relieved, and returned by way of Parkersbnrg and Baltimore, to Philadelphia, whither the battalion at Weston had preceded it, and on the 11th of November, was mustered out of service.

One company, under command of Captain William F. Johnston, re-enlisted for a further term of one year, and formed part of a second regiment, known as the One Hundred and Ninety-second.

In the spring of 1865, nine new companies were recruited, which reported as fast as organized, to the commander of the Middle Military Division, with headquarters at Harper's Ferry, where a regimental organization was effected about the middle of March, with the following field officers:

William W. Stewart, Colonel
Thomas M'Leester, Lieutenant Colonel
William F. Johnston, Major

When the spring campaign opened, the regiment moved up the valley to Staunton and Lexington; but few of the enemy were met, the fighting here being substantially at an end. It was, however, retained in the department, engaged in various duties, until the 21st of August, when it was mustered out of service.

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Source for history & rosters: History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers 1861-1865; prepared in Compliance With Acts of the Legislature, by Samuel P. Bates, A Member of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Volume V, Harrisburg: B. Singerly, State Printer. 1871.